ACYS 2010 > Sector resources > Research > A-D > A fairer future? Addressing education needs of children in care

A fairer future? Addressing education needs of children in care

This presentation was delivered by Dr Sarah Wise on Wednesday 14 October 2009.

Education is central to the wellbeing of children and young people, affecting their quality of life and prospects in adulthood. The 2009 Neale Molloy Social Justice lecture, presented by Dr Sarah Wise, examines the state of human rights and social justice in relation to out-of-home care children’s education. While acknowledging the complexity of children’s needs, the gap in education outcomes between children in care and their peers suggests corporate parents are not living up to their responsibilities. 

Briefing paper No. 3 - A fairer future? 

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