Youth Studies Australia ceased publication in December 2013

Youth Studies Australia was a peer-reviewed journal that for 32 years provided interdisciplinary, research-based information and analysis on issues affecting Australians from early adolescence to young adulthood. It ceased publication in December 2013 after funding was withdrawn in March 2013.

Click here to view the online version of Youth Studies Australia (June 2011 – December 2013)

Free access to the YSA archive

The archive of Youth Studies Australia from 1987–2011 is available free of charge through the Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies website.


 



Cover of Youth Studies Australia December 2013

Youth Studies Australia

ISSN 1839-4914

Volume 32, Number 4
December 2013

Contents of December 2013 issue

Exploring the issue of violence among young males in Australia

An article in The Conversation looks at the reasons why young men continue to behave violently in urban areas, and the culture of male violence generally. Original article

31 Oct 2014

Read about how important mobile phones are to our teens

The vast majority (89%) of 14–17-year-olds have mobiles; young people talk candidly about what they use them for. Original article

31 Oct 2014

CPR should be taught in schools

Young people are not immune from heart problems; a leading cardiologist would like to see CPR as part of the school curriculum so that more lives can be saved. Original story

31 Oct 2014

UN report card on young people makes for grim reading

UNICEF has just released a report card about child wellbeing in 41 countries, and the effected of the economic crisis in Europe have been marked for children and young people although Australia did relatively well. Original story

31 Oct 2014

Children of the recession: the impact of the economic crisis on child well-being in rich countries

This UNICEF report shows that 2.6 million children have sunk below the poverty line in the world’s most affluent countries since 2008, bringing the total number of children in the developed world living in poverty to an estimated 76.5 million. Original article

30 Oct 2014

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